Artwork with a difference

Third-generation farmer Nick Hulland and artist Fintan Magee caught up for a coffee after the completion of the mural.

Third-generation farmer Nick Hulland and artist Fintan Magee caught up for a coffee after the completion of the mural.

The tight-knit Patchewollock community is already reaping the benefits of the silo art trail following the transformation of the town's disused grain silos.

As the finishing touches were made to the 35-metre structure at the weekend, visitors flocked to the town to witness the mural. 

Renowned Australian street artist Fintan Magee was commissioned to undertake the project in what marks the second instalment of the Yarriambiack Shire's silo art trail. 

Once complete the trail will incorporate a 200-kilometre journey, featuring six different artists and towns situated within Yarriambiack Shire. 

Third-generation farmer Nick Hulland, who features on the silo, said he was still coming to terms with the publicity. 

"It's taken a bit of getting used to," he said. 

His image was selected from a shortlist of local identities and was kept under wraps in the lead-up to the project. 

Mr Magee chose to depict him due to his "connection to the agricultural aspects of the region, his heritage and standing in the community". 

"It took a little bit to talk me into it," Mr Hulland said. 

"I only found out that I had been selected a couple of days prior." 

The humble farmer was born and bred in the Mallee. 

His grandfather cleared a block on the edge of Wyperfeld National Park, marking the beginning of an agricultural career which would span three generations. 

To read more of this story, grab a copy of Wednesday's Guardian (October 26th).

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